Heel Pain/Plantar Faciitis

Heel Pain/Plantar Faciitis
Plantar fasciitis is inflammation of the fibrous band of tissue that connects the heel to the toes. Sufferers of plantar fasciitis typically feel pain early in the morning when they first get out of bed.The plantar fascia, a tight band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes, forms the arch of the foot. This band of tissue is important in proper foot mechanics. It is responsible for distributing weight across your foot and leg and transferring weight from the heel to the toes. When the tissue of the arch of the foot becomes irritated and inflamed, even simple movements can be quite painful. Rather than treating the pain, many doctors advise strengthening the damaged or weakened tendons. This advice can prove especially effective in preventing the possible side effects of fallen arches, including: inflammation and discomfort in the ligaments of the sole, Achilles tendonitis, shin splints, calluses and bunions. Like plantar fasciitis, left untreated, fallen arches can cause a domino effect that impacts your legs, hips, and back. The following are some simple steps you can take to strengthen damaged or weakened tendons and prevent further arch pain: Stretch - You can reduce pain and help prevent future episodes of inflammation by stretching your calves, plantar fascia, and Achilles tendon on a regular basis and warming up before starting any physical activity. Replace your insoles: High-impact activity is already a contributor to plantar fasciitis, so be sure that your athletic shoes are providing the maximum support. Replace your insoles before they stop supporting and cushioning your feet. The same goes for dress shoes. Designers are typically focused on the outside of the shoe so you need to focus on the inside. Its a good idea to replace the insole of even a new pair of shoes with one that provides more support, especially arch support, and shock absorption. Be healthy: Maintaining a healthy weight minimizes the stress on your plantar fascia. Other treatment options include: short-term use of anti-inflammatory drugs (available without a prescription at your local drug store), ice, and heat.